Do you even 4x4, bro? Overseas, the Ford Everest is that 5 or 7-row SUV fully capable of heading down the Barrington Trail or any of the mild to moderate dirt tracks and off-road destinations across the world.† Now there’s a new one, still based on the Ranger, and powered by your choice of diesel engines.

Now kitted out in four trim levels (for Australia): Ambiente, Trend, Sport, and Platinum. Most of the images provided are for the Platinum—3.0-litre V6 turbo diesel (shared with the Ranger Raptor), bright tri-coat paint, LED headlights, and…well…as many luxury features as you’d expect from a Platinum F-150 here in North America. The full release is below for reference.

ford everest side view

Rear-drive is available on the lower trim levels, with a widened track compared with the last generation and stronger frame gives better towing, up to 3,500 kg (7,700 lbs). Tow modes and functions are built into the infotainment system.

“The new integrated roof rails – or Platinum-specific stand-off roof rails – are more than just a design detail; they’re engineered for adventure. The Everest rooftop can now support static loads of up to 350kg3 and 350kg3  and dynamic loads of up to 100kg3, providing increased versatility that enables Everest to carry bikes, canoes, cargo pod or roof-top tent. A universal mounting system allows customers to equip their vehicle with a range of accessories.”
– Ford
arb 2023 ford everest suv front view
Ford did an 'overland' build with ARB parts. • source Ford

I appreciate that Ford spells out its roof load specifications, something other manufacturers should publish. Knowing people will be strapping things up there for years to come, having clear reference for customers on what the Everest can carry will keep drivers safe.

† I said earlier it’s capable of heading down those trails—it’s more likely to be used as a mall crawler. Why? If you’re going off-road, it’s simply easier to remove the bed of a Ranger and have a specialist install a dedicated tray and canopy purpose-built for overlanding. Overseas in places like Australia, also drivers need to be aware of much more stringent rules on modification. Kitting out an Everest with an SUV body will hit its GVWR limits much closer, an issue during vehicle inspections.


credits • Ford (source)

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